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Yogurt Against Diabetes

May. 31, 2017 Healthy Living Magazine

Higher consumption of yogurt, compared with no consumption, can reduce the risk of new-onset type 2 diabetes by 28%, says a study in Diabetologia. “At a time when we have a lot of other evidence that consuming high amounts of certain foods, such as added sugars and sugary drinks, is bad for our health, it is very reassuring to have messages about other foods like yogurt and low-fat fermented dairy products that could be good for our health,” said lead author Dr Nita Forouhi from the Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit at the University of Cambridge, UK.

Researchers aren’t sure whether it is the calcium, vitamin D or beneficial bacterial cultures responsible for the effect but emphasize low- or non-fat fermented products are the foods known to be most closely associated with the lowered risk.

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