Article Bookmarked
Bookmark Removed

Why Is It Important for Black Parents to Talk About Racism?


Oct. 30, 2017 Psychology Today

Decades of research have explored how racism affects the mental health and functioning of African American and Black youth. In an article published in the current issue of the Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, the authors discuss that Black youth may experience discrimination and racism; but still be resilient and experience positive outcomes (Jones & Neblett, 2017). The question that may come to mind is “how can someone experience racism and not have negative effects such as depression or low self-esteem”?

Many scholars have highlighted the importance of having the “race talk” or engaging in racial-ethnic socialization (RES). RES involves teaching children about their racial and ethnic heritage, as well as, preparing them to cope with discrimination (Hughes et al., 2006; Jones & Neblett, 2017). Earlier this year, the American Psychological Association released a tool-kit to help parents engage in healthy communication about race and racism. This resource is particularly important given the continued rise of racism and discrimination in America, particularly through social media. The article by Jones and Neblett (2017) demonstrate that engaging in racial and ethnic socialization improves academic performance, decreases depression risk, reduces problem behavior, and provides positive racial identity attitudes. By talking about racism, researchers note that Black parents prepare their children to overcome adversity by challenging stereotypes and allowing Black youth to view their racial identity more positively (e.g., Jones and Neblett, 2017).

In a previous blog, I provided some brief tips on talking about racial differences.

  • Recognize your own views on racial issues
  • Be prepared to manage your emotions and help your child cope. Children often pick up on the behaviors of adults and repeat those. It’s important to model effective ways to cope with racism and discrimination.
  • Use activities, books, or movies to talk about racial differences. By exposing children to books or museums can help share information and start conversations.
  • Share some of your experiences in dealing with racism and discrimination
Read More on Psychology Today

Gene Upshaw Player Assistance Trust Fund

Apply Today

All Resources

Tell Me More

How to Make Relationship Happiness Last

Reappraising conflict from a third-party perspective may preserve happiness.

Read More

8 Things Happy Couples Do For One Another Without Being Asked

It's not the grand gestures but the little things

Read More

Lessons on Leadership and Community from 25 Leaders of Color

Leading self, leading others and leading with vision.

Read More

How to Talk to Your Partner About An Expensive Purchase

This is how to have a discussion without causing frustration or resentment.

Read More

Home prices decline at rates seen close to a decade ago

How much is the housing market tightening?

Read More

Fall Is the Season for Building Mindfulness and Resilience

Days get shorter and cooler, but that doesn't have to get us down.

Read More

A Guide to Becoming an Effective Leader

The 6 Traits of Every Successful Leader

Read More

COVID-19 Is Still Messing Up Our Sleep

Here's How to Sleep Better

Read More