Article Bookmarked
Bookmark Removed

The Big Lie of Obesity


Oct. 27, 2014 Huffington Post

Is your weight the result of your choices? Most people think it is. What if this belief was wrong?

In 1993, the new statistics on obesity in America sent one of my medical school professors into a rant that took up two weeks of class time. He felt we needed to hear the full story of why people gained weight. Ironically, once we got through the jargon, the top researchers’ ideas he shared with us were a bit of a yawn. Here is a one line summary:

Obesity is increasing because of poor choices in diet and activity.

Not very surprising, but is it true? Our current public health messages still stem from this belief. Eat this not that. Move more. The way that we stigmatize and judge those who are heavy also come from this belief. Most of us feel that if people really wanted to change, they just need to try a little harder.

This belief is also the reason behind the social isolation and emotional pain known by many who feel too heavy. When you are in this you are left feeling that you must not be good enough to change themselves. I know because I’ve been there.

Read More on Huffington Post

Gene Upshaw Player Assistance Trust Fund

Apply Today

All Resources

Tell Me More

COVID-19 Is Still Messing Up Our Sleep

Here's How to Sleep Better

Read More

Ultra-processed foods linked to heart disease, cancer, and death, studies show

Cooking and choosing natural foods can, quite literally, be life saving.

Read More

How to Lower Your Cholesterol Naturally

Fight a leading cause of death and disease.

Read More

Vitamin D supplementation

The vitamin's impact on depression and wellness.

Read More

Home prices decline at rates seen close to a decade ago

How much is the housing market tightening?

Read More

Fall Is the Season for Building Mindfulness and Resilience

Days get shorter and cooler, but that doesn't have to get us down.

Read More

A Guide to Becoming an Effective Leader

The 6 Traits of Every Successful Leader

Read More

How to Make Relationship Happiness Last

Reappraising conflict from a third-party perspective may preserve happiness.

Read More