Article Bookmarked
Bookmark Removed

Sleep On It


Apr. 1, 2014 NIH

When you learn something new, the best way to remember it is to sleep on it. That’s because sleeping helps strengthen memories you’ve formed throughout the day. It also helps to link new memories to earlier ones. You might even come up with creative new ideas while you slumber.

What happens to memories in your brain while you sleep? And how does lack of sleep affect your ability to learn and remember? NIH-funded scientists have been gathering clues about the complex relationship between sleep and memory. Their findings might eventually lead to new approaches to help students learn or help older people hold onto memories as they age.

Read More on NIH

Gene Upshaw Player Assistance Trust Fund

Apply Today

All Resources

Tell Me More

How to Be Happy

Public policies based on culture are making people happy.

Read More

6 Strategies for Managing Disappointments

How to navigate the aftereffects of rejection.

Read More

5 Good Ways to Construct Habits

Habit formation doesn't need to feel boring or punishing.

Read More

Are We What We Eat? Nutritional Psychiatry and Brain Health

Our brains are hungry. Here's what to eat.

Read More

Why Microsoft Measures Employee Thriving, Not Engagement

A new way to support and empower your teams.

Read More

The Truth About Fasting and Type 2 Diabetes

Fasting: fad or century old-tradition?

Read More

Homeownership: Understanding Hidden Costs

Learn more about down payments, closing costs and taxes.

Read More

How to Craft a Fulfilling Career

Practical tips for aligning your values with your work.

Read More