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Most People Don’t Want to Be Managers


Sep. 18, 2014 HBR Blogs

Most American workers aren’t interested in becoming managers. At least, that’s what a new CareerBuilder survey seems to suggest.

Of the thousands surveyed, only about one-third of workers (34%) said they aspire to leadership positions – and just 7% strive for C-level management (the rest said they aspire to middle-management or department-head roles). Broken down further, the results show that more men (40%) hope to have a leadership role than women (29%), and that African Americans (39%) and LGBT workers (44%) are more likely to want to climb the corporate ladder than the national average.

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