Article Bookmarked
Bookmark Removed

Intermittent fasting boosts health by strengthening daily rhythms


Jan. 24, 2019 Medical News Today

While the modern world appears awash with fad diets, people seem to be giving a fair bit of attention to intermittent fasting.

As its name implies, intermittent fasting involves eating nothing for extended periods of time.

Some studies have found that this type of diet is beneficial, but exactly why it benefits health is not yet clear.

Recently, a group of scientists at the University of California, Irvine investigated the impact of fasting on our circadian clock.

Daily sleep–wake cycles, or circadian rhythms, drive the ebb and flow of human life; they control much more than just our sleepiness levels. Our 24-hour cycles involve metabolic, physiological, and behavioral changes that impact every tissue of the body.

Perhaps the most well-known way to influence the clock is via exposure to bright lights, but this isn’t the only way; food intake also impacts the clock.

We are slowly beginning to understand how eating plays a role in modulating circadian rhythms, but we know even less about how a lack of food might affect rhythms.

Fasting and circadian rhythms

The authors of the new study were particularly interested in learning about how fasting influenced circadian rhythms in the liver and skeletal muscles. The researchers published their findings in the journal Cell Reports.

Fasting is a natural phenomenon for most animals, because food is not always readily available. In times of hardship, certain metabolic changes occur to allow the body to adapt.

As an example, one study split mice into two groups; the researchers put one on an intermittent fasting regime, and they allowed the second to eat whenever it liked.

Both groups consumed the same amount of fat and calories; however, despite having the same energy intake, mice in the fasting group did not develop obesity or metabolic disorders as the other mice did.

Also, importantly, the authors noted that the animals’ circadian oscillations were more robust in the fasting group.

As the authors of the recent study point out, “[F]asting appears to be a strong metabolic cue to entrain rhythmic gene expression.”

Scientists believe that having more clearly defined cycles might be part of the reason that fasting promotes good health.

How might this benefit us?

Having assessed the gene changes that occur with fasting, the scientists now need to explain how they might benefit health.

Prof. Sassone-Corsi suggests that “the reorganization of gene regulation by fasting could prime the genome to a more permissive state to anticipate upcoming food intake and thereby drive a new rhythmic cycle of gene expression.”

He adds, “In other words, fasting is able to essentially reprogram a variety of cellular responses. Therefore, optimal fasting in a timed manner would be strategic to positively affect cellular functions and ultimately benefitting health and protecting against aging-associated diseases.”

Over the years, it has grown increasingly clear that disrupting circadian rhythms can increase the risk of obesity and metabolic disorders, such as diabetes. This new work brings us closer to understanding why that might be.

Though understanding the influence of fasting on circadian rhythms and gene expression is still in its infancy, the authors hope that one day, their work will help find the optimum fasting regime for health.

Read More on Medical News Today

Gene Upshaw Player Assistance Trust Fund

Apply Today

All Resources

Tell Me More

Coffee and the Health of Your Heart

Up to 25 cups of coffee a day still safe for heart health, study says.

Read More

Energy drinks may have unintended health risks

Energy drinks can give you a short term boost, but come with serious concerns.

Read More

11 foods that lower cholesterol

Foods that make up a low cholesterol diet can help reduce high levels in your body.

Read More

How Sleep, Mood, and Age Impact Working Memory

How disrupted sleep can impact your ability to learn and function.

Read More

5 factors affecting happiness and wellbeing

The interconnectivity of the mind, the body, your relationships and finances come crashing together.

Read More

Stop "People Pleasing" to Build Better Relationships

People pleasers don’t always please others—and seldom please themselves.

Read More

Is an MBA Worth It? How to Decide

Consider both the short- and long-term payoff before enrolling in an MBA program, experts say.

Read More

More Changes to Debt Collection Could Be on the Way

Know the limits and rules that regulate debt collectors before making any decisions.

Read More