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Finding a Career Track in LinkedIn Profiles


Jul. 31, 2015 New York Times

College students increasingly view their time on campus as a hoop to jump through on their way to a job, yet many have no idea where they will land.

While previous generations’ career tracks were simple and mostly linear, now entire industries expand and contract at alarming speed. In this new world, government statistics move too slowly to capture employment dynamics. What jobs are available in a particular occupation? What type of experiences do I need to get a job in those professions? What did people who have those jobs study in college?

As we live more of our lives online and use social media to update friends, family and colleagues on our job moves, much of what we need to know about the changing labor market is crowd sourced in real time. And many of those digital breadcrumbs end up in LinkedIn profiles.

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