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Deaths from heart disease and conditions are on the rise


Aug. 29, 2019 CNN

Death rates in the United States due to cardiometabolic diseases — heart disease, stroke, diabetes and high blood pressure — have either plateaued or climbed in recent years, new research reveals.The rates of death from those health conditions were declining but then hit a concerning inflection point in 2010, and either remained unchanged or increased thereafter, according to research published in the medical journal JAMA on Tuesday.

“We are losing ground in the battle against cardiovascular disease. Understanding what is contributing to these alarming trends may help direct specific strategies for prevention,” said Dr. Sadiya Khan, an assistant professor of cardiology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, who was the senior author of the research.

“Even more alarming are the persistent disparities with higher death rates among black Americans compared with white Americans,” Khan said. The research found that black adults consistently had higher cardiometabolic-related death rates than white adults, and black men had the highest rates.

“We need to reduce deaths from cardiometabolic diseases and we need to find strategies to reduce disparities,” she said.

Separately, in a written statement on Tuesday, Khan pointed out how the majority of the cardiometabolic deaths are preventable.

“Our findings make it clear that we are losing ground in the battle against cardiovascular disease,” she said in the statement. “We need to shift our focus as a nation toward prevention to achieve our goal of living longer, healthier and free of cardiovascular disease.”

The new research involved analyzing data from death certificates in the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s WONDER database. The death certificates dated from 1999 to 2017.

The data showed that in 1999, total deaths by cause were 725,192 from heart disease, 167,366 from stroke, 68,399 from diabetes, and 16,968 from hypertension.

In 2017, total deaths by cause were 647,457 from heart disease, 146,383 from stroke, 83,564 from diabetes, and 35,316 from hypertension, the data showed.

From 1999 to 2017, 12.3% of fatal cardiometabolic events occurred in black individuals and 85.1% in white individuals, and 51.3% occurred in women, the data showed.

The researchers also found that the death rate for heart disease declined between 1999 and 2010 — and during those years there were 8.3 fewer deaths per 100,000 people annually versus the years following 2010.

The death rates also were going down for stroke and diabetes before 2010 but did not significantly change between that year and 2017, the data showed.

As for hypertension or high blood pressure, there was an inflection point in 2003 and the death rate tied to that condition increased less rapidly thereafter, the researchers found.

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