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Claim These Tax Deductions Even If You Don’t Itemize


Jan. 15, 2020 Kiplinger

Bulking up the standard deduction has let millions of taxpayers avoid the hassle of itemizing write-offs on their tax return because the bigger standard deduction would exceed their qualifying expenses.

But there’s a handful of tax breaks that people taking the standard deduction can still claim to lower their tax bill. Most of these so-called “above-the-line” deductions have no income limits, so anybody can claim them. And in addition to the direct tax savings from these breaks—for taxpayers in the 24% tax bracket, for instance, every $1,000 in above-the-line deductions will lower your tax bill by $240—your lowered AGI could enable you to claim other tax breaks that have income limits.

Individual Retirement Account

Contributing to a traditional individual retirement account (IRA) is a win-win move that lets you boost your retirement savings and trim your tax bill at the same time. The contribution limit is $6,000 ($7,000 if you’re 50 or older) for 2019, and if you don’t have a retirement plan at work (or your spouse does), every dollar of that can be knocked off your income. If you’re covered by a retirement plan at the office (or your spouse is) then that deduction might be limited by your income on your 2019 return.

You may make 2019 IRA contributions up until April 15, 2020.

Note that, for 2020, the contribution limits remain the same, but the income limits for the deduction are slightly higher.

Health Savings Account

Are you funding a health savings account (HSA) in conjunction with a high-deductible health plan (HDHP)? Smart move.

You get an above-the-line deduction for contributions to the HSA, assuming you made them with after-tax money. If you contributed pretax funds through payroll deduction on the job, there’s no double-dipping—so no write off. In either case, you need to file a Form 8889 with your return. The maximum contribution for 2019 is $7,000 for family coverage and $3,500 if you’re an individual (they are slightly higher for 2020). If you’re 55 or over at any time in the year, you can contribute (and deduct) another $1,000.

Self Employment Deductions

If you work for yourself, you have to pay both the employer and the employee share of Social Security and Medicare taxes—a whopping 15.3% of net self-employment income. But at least you get to write off half of what you pay as an adjustment to income. You can also deduct contributions to a self-directed retirement plan such as a SEP or SIMPLE plan (and those can cut big chunks off your income).

Also deductible as an adjustment to income: the cost of health insurance for the self-employed (and their families)—including Medicare premiums and supplemental Medicare (Medigap), up to your business’ net income. You can’t claim this deduction if you are eligible to be covered under a health plan subsidized either by your employer (if you have a job as well as your business) or your spouse’s employer (if he or she has a job that offers family medical coverage).

Educational Costs

If you paid college tuition for yourself, your spouse or a dependent in 2019, you may be able to deduct up to $4,000 in college tuition and fees. To qualify for the full deduction, your adjusted gross income must be $130,000 or less if married filing jointly ($65,000 or less if single). You can deduct up to $2,000 in tuition and fees if your joint income was $160,000 or less ($80,000 or less if single). There is no deduction if you earn more than that. (This deduction expired at the end of 2017; however, it was retroactively extended through 2020 in December 2019. You can file an amended return to claim it for the 2018 tax year.)

In addition, up to $2,500 in student-loan interest (for you, your spouse or a dependent) can be tax-deductible on 2019 returns if your modified adjusted gross income is less than $70,000 if you’re single or $140,000 if you are married and file a joint return. The deduction is phased out above those levels, disappearing completely if you earn more than $85,000 if single or $170,000 if filing a joint return.

Click Read More for Other Deductions on Your 2020 Taxes.

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