Article Bookmarked
Bookmark Removed

A financial shock could wreck retirees’ or pre-retirees’ finances


Mar. 26, 2022 Yahoo Finance

According to a recent Society of Actuaries survey, about half of the pre-retirees report experiencing some type of unexpected financial shock, as well as more than 4 in 10 retirees. And, 1 in 5 pre-retirees report that these shocks have reduced their assets by 25% or more and reduced their spending by 10% or more.

The good news is that far fewer retirees report these reductions, according to the 2021 Retirement Risk Survey Report of Findings. For example, just 1 in 10 retirees (11%) report that shocks reduced their assets by more than 25%.

Pre-retirees least prepared for a crisis

Other key findings: When asked what they could afford to spend out of pocket on an emergency without jeopardizing their retirement security, half of pre-retirees report that they could only afford to spend $10,000 or less and more than half of retirees could afford no more than $25,000. Black/African American pre-retirees (61%) are more likely than pre-retirees in general (40%) to be impacted by an unexpected expense of up to $10,000.

Among retirees, Black/African American respondents (58%) and Hispanic/Latino (52%) said they are not able to spend $10,000 without it affecting their retirement security. This was much greater than the general retiree response (32%), according to the Society of Actuaries survey.

So, what to make of all this? How might you, be you a pre-retiree or retiree, better prepare for unexpected financial shocks?

Build an emergency fund

Most financial planners recommend that you have at least three to six months of living expenses set aside for, well, emergencies or financial shocks, such as a new roof or dental work.

“Early in my career, I had a 90-plus-year-old client say to me regarding financial assets, ‘You never know what it will take to get you out of this world,’” said Bill Harris, a certified financial planner with WH Cornerstone Investments. “Her life wisdom was spot on. I use that quote to tell pre-retirees with ‘constrained’ or under-funded retirement assets that life has its unexpected turns. We also tell pre-retirees, ‘You can never ever save enough for retirement. An emergency fund is always needed.’”

Build a reserve fund too

Unexpected spending shocks are a reality at any age, said Roger Whitney, host of the “Retirement Answer Man” podcast. “When they happen in retirement – after income from work ends – they aren’t as easily absorbed or worked through,” he said. “To be better prepared, create options for your future self to deal with a shock. Building cash reserves above a normal emergency fund, eliminating debt to lower fixed monthly payments, or working part time can help create financial slack to help you be agile as your retirement life unfolds.”

Read More on Yahoo Finance

Gene Upshaw Player Assistance Trust Fund

Apply Today

All Resources

Tell Me More

Home prices decline at rates seen close to a decade ago

How much is the housing market tightening?

Read More

Why is It So Hard to Talk About Debt?

Self-perception and emotions can make it a challenge.

Read More

How Do I Stop Robocalls From Scamming Me?

Here are ways to make it stop.

Read More

Someone Took Out a Loan in Your Name. Now What?

From disputing errors to filing a police report. What you can do.

Read More

‘Night owls’ may have greater type 2 diabetes and heart disease risk than ‘early birds’

Why shifting your sleep pattern may be a great idea.

Read More

Fall Is the Season for Building Mindfulness and Resilience

Days get shorter and cooler, but that doesn't have to get us down.

Read More

A Guide to Becoming an Effective Leader

The 6 Traits of Every Successful Leader

Read More

How to Make Relationship Happiness Last

Reappraising conflict from a third-party perspective may preserve happiness.

Read More