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9 Winter Car Maintenance Tips


Nov. 1, 2017 Kiplinger

We’re assuming you’ve covered the basics (such as the scraper) and are up-to-date on your car’s regular scheduled service. Don’t postpone that—a mishap that would just be an annoyance in warmer weather could be a life-endangering hazard in the winter.

Don’t Make Compost in Your Car
As you tackle fall’s bounty on your lawn, leave some energy for removing the leaves that find their way into your vehicle.

Leaves, twigs and other organic matter can cause havoc with gutters on your house—and the equivalent on your car. When debris builds up in areas of your car where water is supposed to run out, you can get leaks or corrosion.

The air plenum near the windshield is a classic spot where this can happen.

If you have a sunroof, open it up and look around in there, too, from outside the car. Sunroofs have drains to flow water that sneaks past the seals down and out of the car. Plant gunk in there can plug those drains, making wet headliners or worse.

Less common, but more problematic: Animals may make nests under the hood. You may need a mechanic and an animal trapper to fully solve this problem.

Consider Winter Tires
So-called “all-season” tires have been on the market for decades. Coupled with front-wheel-drive and stability-control systems, they have allowed many folks to avoid mounting a true winter tire for the winter months. But there are two trends in tires you should be aware of:

1) Styling priorities have led to manufacturers fitting wider, low-profile tires on many cars. Wide and low profile, on balance, makes a tire worse in the snow. Pressures to improve tire fuel economy have also worked against the snow handling of all-seasons.

2) Winter tires have improved their behavior from the era of knobby, loud “snows” that looked like they belonged on an army truck. New tread patterns and rubber compounds make them quieter on dry roads, yet even more effective on frozen stuff.

If you choose to go with winter tires, note that vendors such as The Tire Rack and Discount Tire Direct offer packages with the tires already mounted on a new set of wheels. Changing out the entire wheel/tire combo for the winter is more cost-effective than having two sets of tires switched on and off your wheels in fall and winter

Whatever you choose for tires, make sure there’s enough tread on them as you head into winter. Getting through snow requires the deepest grooves possible, and worn tires on which you might have skated by in summer will put you into the ditch in the white stuff. See if you have enough with this coin-based test from The Tire Rack.

Mount Wipers for Snow, Too
Fog, snow and rain will cut down your visibility in winter.

Check your wiper blades, which have a lifespan of about a year. If your car doesn’t have the newer “beam blade” style wipers, consider a pair, especially for the winter months. The beam style blades don’t have an external spring to freeze up.

When snow or other freezing precipitation threaten, make sure you turn off the wipers when you park so that the next time you turn on your car, the wiper motor’s not fighting to get frozen wipers moving. This can burn out the wiper motor.

Some folks pop their wipers up when they park so they’re not touching the windshield if freezing stuff is in the forecast. This little trick will make it easier to scrape your windshield. Some folks believe this wears out the spring that keeps the blade on the glass. And some folks think it’s an affectation. The choice is yours.

Is Your Battery Fully Juiced?
Winter puts more stress on your battery, particularly if you park your car outdoors.

Avoid the sinking feeling of hearing nothing when you hit the ignition with a proactive check of your battery and charging system now. Repair shops don’t usually charge very much to load-test your battery, and some car-parts stores will do it for free.

If you find out your battery’s going south, you can replace it at your convenience, instead of being at the mercy of whatever shop your dead car’s been towed to. Note that some big-box stores such as Costco offer a good price on batteries for those of you willing to change one yourself (not usually all that hard, though batteries are heavy.)

 

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